Woodrow W. Winchester III

AUSTIN, Texas – Woodrow W. Winchester, III, an expert in engineering professional development and continuing education, has been named the new executive director of The University of Texas at Austin Texas Engineering Executive Education (TxEEE). TxEEE provides for-credit graduate degrees and continuing education programs for working professionals as part of the UT Cockrell School of Engineering. Winchester begins on July 1, 2022.

Methane Emissions in Natural Gas

A new, two-part class through Texas Engineering Executive Education (TxEEE), the professional development division of the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, aims to give the energy industry greater understanding of how to utilize, manage and understand one of the world’s most important fuels while reducing the release of a potent greenhouse gas.

Methane Expert David Allen, Ph.D.

David Allen, Ph.D. is a world-renown expert in the energy field and our primary instructor for the upcoming Methane Emissions in the Natural Gas Supply Chain course. As the Melvin H. Gertz Regents Chair in Chemical Engineering, Allen has made vast contributions to the university’s teaching, research and service missions in areas such as air quality and environmental sustainability.

Congrats to our May 2022 Graduates!

Nothing is more exciting than achieving a monumental goal, such as completing a master’s degree. Join us in congratulating our graduates of our Master of Science in Engineering Management, Master of Science in Software Engineering, and Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering.

TxEEE Celebrates Our Women Professors and Instructors

In honor of March as Women’s History Month, Texas Engineering Executive Education (TxEEE) celebrates our women professors and instructors across our master’s programs and engineering professional development programs. Below are just a few of the various women engineers and business professionals who contribute to the learning of our students and program participants.

Gary L. Thomas Energy Engineering building (GLT)

Texas Engineering Executive Education (TxEEE) will soon have a new home in the heart of the UT campus at the corner of Speedway and 24th St! As part of a decade-long comprehensive renovation and expansion of the UT Cockrell School of Engineering’s engineering corridor, the Gary L. Thomas Energy Engineering building (GLT) is nearing completion later this spring and TxEEE will be the largest administrative unit housed in the building.

Bob Gilbert, Ph.D.

An expert in geotechnical engineering, Dr. Bob Gilbert is chair of the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering in the Cockrell School of Engineering and is a long-time instructor in the TxEEE Offshore Engineering Professional Development Course Series (enroll now)! Dr. Gilbert was elected to the National Academy of Engineers (NAE) in 2020. Election to the academy is among the highest professional distinctions for an engineer. We are thrilled to have him as an instructor in all three courses in the Offshore series.

Lifelong Engineering Education at the Cockrell School

For more than 45 years, the Cockrell School of Engineering has provided engineering professional development and lifelong learning opportunities for working engineers, corporate clients, alumni, and STEM professionals.

Changes Coming to the Engineering Management Degree

As new and innovative technology continues to become an integral part of our society, the need for engineers who can integrate technical expertise, business acumen, and effective interpersonal communication skills is in high demand and growing. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of engineering managers is projected to continue increasing as the nation’s aging infrastructure requires expansion and repair in addition to the rise of renewable energy construction and design.

Saved By the Zoom: The Swift Shift to Remote Learning

Two years ago, in fall 2018, there were close to 3.2 million students in the U.S. enrolled in fully remote post-high school classes, representing roughly 17% of all students at that level. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic flipped this ratio, forcing the vast majority of students into virtual classrooms and bringing remote learning to the mainstream of traditional education.